Announcements

 

Get caught up with Andrews & Co.

Whether it's tax season or welcoming new team members, we have a lot going on at our firm. We'll keep you connected by sharing our ongoing news.

  • Andrews & Co. Welcomes New Partner!
    Posted

    We are very excited to announce that Steve Pittman CPA, CA, CBV has joined our firm!

     

    With over twenty-five years’ experience providing business valuation services, Steve is a true expert in his field and highly dedicated to his profession. He has extensive experience in business valuation, forensic accounting, economic loss, and damage quantification services; he is also skilled in a variety of litigation-related services, including Family Law, for which he prepares income reports for determining spousal and child support. He also assisted the Department of Justice Canada in defining income when the Federal Child Support Guidelines Legislation was introduced.

     

    Steve is often called to provide expert witness testimonies in court. He has qualified as an expert witness in the Ontario Superior Court of Justice, the Federal Court of Canada, and the Tax Court of Canada.

     

    As a true asset to our firm, Steve offers us a new and diverse service in business valuation. He is very personable, has served as both lecturer and treasurer to many reputable institutions and organizations, and is an all-around great guy! We could not be happier to have him join our team!

    Welcome Steve!

    We are very excited to announce that Steve Pittman CPA, CA, CBV has joined our firm!

     

    With over twenty-five years’ experience providing business valuation services, Steve is a true expert in his field and highly dedicated to his profession. He has extensive experience in business valuation, forensic accounting, economic loss, and damage quantification services; he is also skilled in a variety of litigation-related services, including Family Law, for which he prepares income reports for determining spousal and child support. He also assisted the Department of Justice Canada in defining income when the Federal Child Support Guidelines Legislation was introduced.

     

    Steve is often called to provide expert witness testimonies in court. He has qualified as an expert witness in the Ontario Superior Court of Justice, the Federal Court of Canada, and the Tax Court of Canada.

     

    As a true asset to our firm, Steve offers us a new and diverse service in business valuation. He is very personable, has served as both lecturer and treasurer to many reputable institutions and organizations, and is an all-around great guy! We could not be happier to have him join our team!

    Welcome Steve!

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  • Are your tips subject to CPP and EI?
    Posted

    Employees who earn tips or gratuities are required to report these amounts as income earned. This type of income may be included as insurable earnings and is subject to CPP and EI.

    There are two types of tips an employee may receive: controlled tips and direct tips.

    Controlled tips are considered part of the employee’s total gross pay and are therefore subject to CPP and EI. Controlled tips are provided by the employer and are considered to have been paid from the employer to the employee. Common examples of controlled tips are:

    • Tips that are given to the employer and later disbursed to the employees.
    • When a tip sharing formula is used by the employer to allocate the tips to employees.

    Direct tips are not considered to be under control of the employer and are paid out by the customer. This type of gratuity is not subject to CPP or EI. Common examples of direct tips are:

    • Tips left by a customer after the service is complete and the employee keeps the entire amount.
    • Tips that are shared among the employees in a method determined by the employees, with no input from the employer.

    An employee may receive both types of tips, but only the controlled tips will be included in the employee’s insurable earnings.

    When an employer uses a controlled tip method, they are responsible for including the amounts in their employee’s gross earnings and must make the corresponding deductions for CPP and EI.

    If you are unsure of what type of tip system your company is using, or how to account for tips within insurable earnings, contact your accountant today!

    Employees who earn tips or gratuities are required to report these amounts as income earned. This type of income may be included as insurable earnings and is subject to CPP and EI.

    There are two types of tips an employee may receive: controlled tips and direct tips.

    Controlled tips are considered part of the employee’s total gross pay and are therefore subject to CPP and EI. Controlled tips are provided by the employer and are considered to have been paid from the employer to the employee. Common examples of controlled tips are:

    • Tips that are given to the employer and later disbursed to the employees.
    • When a tip sharing formula is used by the employer to allocate the tips to employees.

    Direct tips are not considered to be under control of the employer and are paid out by the customer. This type of gratuity is not subject to CPP or EI. Common examples of direct tips are:

    • Tips left by a customer after the service is complete and the employee keeps the entire amount.
    • Tips that are shared among the employees in a method determined by the employees, with no input from the employer.

    An employee may receive both types of tips, but only the controlled tips will be included in the employee’s insurable earnings.

    When an employer uses a controlled tip method, they are responsible for including the amounts in their employee’s gross earnings and must make the corresponding deductions for CPP and EI.

    If you are unsure of what type of tip system your company is using, or how to account for tips within insurable earnings, contact your accountant today!

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  • Capital gains exemption
    Posted

    The Capital Gains Exemption (CGE) is available to Canadian residents who have disposed of qualifying property.

    • Qualifying property is identified as Qualified Small Business Corporation (QSBC) shares, qualifying farm property, and qualifying fishing property. The CGE allows for the reduction in the gain reported in taxable income.

    Example:
    A total net capital gain on the disposition of qualifying property is $50,000, and 50% of this is brought into net income. Provided all eligibility criteria are met, the individual could have enough CGE to offset the entire taxable capital gain. This results in none of the original gain being brought into taxable income.

    In 2014, the lifetime limit was $800,000. Going forward, this limit will be indexed for inflation.

    What is a Qualifying Small Business Corporation Share?

    The shares of a private corporation would qualify as a QSBC share if the following criteria have been
    met:

    1. At the date of disposition, the shares must be those of a Small Business Corporation (SBC), a Canadian Controlled Private Corporation (CCPC) in which 90% or more of its assets (measured at fair market value) are:
      1. Used in business, actively and primarily carried out in Canada (50% or more); or
      2. Invested in either the shares or debt of a connected SBC.
    2. During the last 24 months immediately prior to the disposition:
      1. The shares are CCPC shares;
      2. More than 50% of the company’s assets (measured at fair market value) are used in carrying on active business primarily in Canada; or
      3. The shares were owned by either the taxpayer or a related person.

    Your business may qualify as a QSBC. If you are considering selling your business, consult with your accountant immediately to ensure that proper structure is be maintained.

    The Capital Gains Exemption (CGE) is available to Canadian residents who have disposed of qualifying property.

    • Qualifying property is identified as Qualified Small Business Corporation (QSBC) shares, qualifying farm property, and qualifying fishing property. The CGE allows for the reduction in the gain reported in taxable income.

    Example:
    A total net capital gain on the disposition of qualifying property is $50,000, and 50% of this is brought into net income. Provided all eligibility criteria are met, the individual could have enough CGE to offset the entire taxable capital gain. This results in none of the original gain being brought into taxable income.

    In 2014, the lifetime limit was $800,000. Going forward, this limit will be indexed for inflation.

    What is a Qualifying Small Business Corporation Share?

    The shares of a private corporation would qualify as a QSBC share if the following criteria have been
    met:

    1. At the date of disposition, the shares must be those of a Small Business Corporation (SBC), a Canadian Controlled Private Corporation (CCPC) in which 90% or more of its assets (measured at fair market value) are:
      1. Used in business, actively and primarily carried out in Canada (50% or more); or
      2. Invested in either the shares or debt of a connected SBC.
    2. During the last 24 months immediately prior to the disposition:
      1. The shares are CCPC shares;
      2. More than 50% of the company’s assets (measured at fair market value) are used in carrying on active business primarily in Canada; or
      3. The shares were owned by either the taxpayer or a related person.

    Your business may qualify as a QSBC. If you are considering selling your business, consult with your accountant immediately to ensure that proper structure is be maintained.

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  • Non-contemporary sources of income
    Posted

    Did you receive funds this year through a non­-contemporary source? Are you unsure of the tax implications imposed by receiving these funds? We are here to help!

    Non­-contemporary income sources include, but are not limited to:

    Crowdfunding

    • Raising funds from the public to be used towards a special project.

    Any funds received by means of crowdfunding are considered income and are ultimately taxable.

    Expenses incurred that relate to any crowdfunding efforts – for the purpose of gaining income – may be deductible if other requirements from the Income Tax Act are met.

    YouTube Advertising

    • Money received from YouTube when your post generates a specific number of views.

    The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) views this income source as taxable and must be reported.

    Selling Goods Online

    • Money received from the sale of goods on eBay, Kijiji, and other third party websites.

    The CRA targets high­-volume sellers who earn a minimum of $20,000 with at least 24 sales per year, or sellers who generate over $100,000 in a single year.

    eBay has released details on certain Canadian eBay sellers who meet the above criteria.

    If you are unsure on whether the funds you have received during the year are considered taxable income, please consult with your accountant before filing your income tax return.

    Did you receive funds this year through a non­-contemporary source? Are you unsure of the tax implications imposed by receiving these funds? We are here to help!

    Non­-contemporary income sources include, but are not limited to:

    Crowdfunding

    • Raising funds from the public to be used towards a special project.

    Any funds received by means of crowdfunding are considered income and are ultimately taxable.

    Expenses incurred that relate to any crowdfunding efforts – for the purpose of gaining income – may be deductible if other requirements from the Income Tax Act are met.

    YouTube Advertising

    • Money received from YouTube when your post generates a specific number of views.

    The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) views this income source as taxable and must be reported.

    Selling Goods Online

    • Money received from the sale of goods on eBay, Kijiji, and other third party websites.

    The CRA targets high­-volume sellers who earn a minimum of $20,000 with at least 24 sales per year, or sellers who generate over $100,000 in a single year.

    eBay has released details on certain Canadian eBay sellers who meet the above criteria.

    If you are unsure on whether the funds you have received during the year are considered taxable income, please consult with your accountant before filing your income tax return.

    Read More
  • Personal Tax Returns: Common Mistakes
    Posted

    The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) has provided a detailed list of the most common mistakes found with personal tax returns. Understanding these common errors will help you save time and money in the long run.

    The common mistakes as noted by the CRA are:

    Moving Expenses

    • Costs associated with home staging, job and house hunting, renovations, mail forwarding, storage costs (near former residence), and short­-term accommodation are all expenses that are not eligible to be claimed.
    • Receipt issues, such as date of receipt being inconsistent with date of move, or the receipt specifying payment occurred at a later date, but contains no proof of later payment.

    Student Loans

    • Non­-eligible interest cannot be claimed. Interest is only eligible to be claimed on loans received under a federal or provincial/territorial government law. Interest paid on personal loans, student lines of credit, or foreign student loans is not an eligible deduction.
    • Only official receipts with the taxpayer’s name are eligible for claim. Tuition, Education and Textbooks
    • Only official receipts with the course name appearing on the receipt are eligible for claim. Invoices do not replace an official receipt.
    • Part­-time months cannot be claimed as full-­time months – and vice versa.
    • Attending an educational institution not recognized by the CRA.

    Medical Expenses

    • Common expenses that cannot be claimed are:
      • Vitamins, natural supplements, and over­-the­-counter medication,
      • Medical supplies, such as bandages, shoe inserts, etc.,
      • Non­medical furniture such as recliners and non­-hospital beds; and
      • Cosmetic procedures.

    Public Transit

    • The copy of the transit pass must be complete. It cannot have your name missing or an illegible signature.
    • Electronic payment cards must meet the minimum 32 one­-way trip requirement in a 31 day period.

    To ensure that any of the mistakes above are not being made, consult with your accountant if you have any questions regarding your personal tax return.

    The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) has provided a detailed list of the most common mistakes found with personal tax returns. Understanding these common errors will help you save time and money in the long run.

    The common mistakes as noted by the CRA are:

    Moving Expenses

    • Costs associated with home staging, job and house hunting, renovations, mail forwarding, storage costs (near former residence), and short­-term accommodation are all expenses that are not eligible to be claimed.
    • Receipt issues, such as date of receipt being inconsistent with date of move, or the receipt specifying payment occurred at a later date, but contains no proof of later payment.

    Student Loans

    • Non­-eligible interest cannot be claimed. Interest is only eligible to be claimed on loans received under a federal or provincial/territorial government law. Interest paid on personal loans, student lines of credit, or foreign student loans is not an eligible deduction.
    • Only official receipts with the taxpayer’s name are eligible for claim. Tuition, Education and Textbooks
    • Only official receipts with the course name appearing on the receipt are eligible for claim. Invoices do not replace an official receipt.
    • Part­-time months cannot be claimed as full-­time months – and vice versa.
    • Attending an educational institution not recognized by the CRA.

    Medical Expenses

    • Common expenses that cannot be claimed are:
      • Vitamins, natural supplements, and over­-the­-counter medication,
      • Medical supplies, such as bandages, shoe inserts, etc.,
      • Non­medical furniture such as recliners and non­-hospital beds; and
      • Cosmetic procedures.

    Public Transit

    • The copy of the transit pass must be complete. It cannot have your name missing or an illegible signature.
    • Electronic payment cards must meet the minimum 32 one­-way trip requirement in a 31 day period.

    To ensure that any of the mistakes above are not being made, consult with your accountant if you have any questions regarding your personal tax return.

    Read More
  • Principal Residence Exemption
    Posted

    Did you recently sell a property and make a gain on its sale? Are you wondering whether there is any tax to pay on this sale?

    If the property has been designated as your principal residence for the entire length of ownership, then there are no tax implications. To qualify as a principal residence, the property must have been owned by you or jointly with another person. Additionally, you, your spouse (current or former), or any of your children must have lived in the property for some period of time.

    You are only allowed to designate one property per year as your principal residence. Situations that tend to complicate tax matters occur when more than one property is owned during the same time period.

    When this occurs, you should designate the years of principal residence to the property with the highest capital gains on a per year basis. This will help minimize income taxes throughout your life, whereas designating all the years to the first property sold will simply minimize taxes in the first year of sale.

    What properties are eligible for the principal residence exemption?

    • House
    • Cottage
    • Condominium
    • Apartment (in an apartment building or duplex)
    • Trailer, Motor Home, or Houseboat

    How do I calculate my exemption?

    (1 + # of years designated / total # of years owned) x Capital Gain = Principal Residence Exemption

    Example:

    You own two properties:

    1. House – purchased in 2001 for $350,000
    2. Cottage – purchased in 2005 for $150,000

    In 2014, you sold your house for $500,000 and moved into your cottage (which had a market value of $200,000).

    House:

    • Initial purchase price: $350,000
    • Sale price: $500,000
    • Gain: $150,000 ($500,000 – $350,000)
    • # of years owned: 14
    • Gain per year: $10,714

    Cottage:

    • Initial purchase price: $150,000
    • Sale price: $200,000
    • Gain: $50,000 ($200,000 – $150,000)
    • # of years owned: 10
    • Gain per year: $5,000

    This example shows the accrued gains per year on the house is higher than the accrued gains on the cottage. Therefore, designating it as the principal residence for all those years is the most appropriate tax decision. This would result in the entire gain on the sale of the house begin exempt for tax purposes. Going forward, the cottage can claim the principal residence designation.

    If you are considering selling a property and have further questions, you should contact your accountant at once for helpful advice!

    Did you recently sell a property and make a gain on its sale? Are you wondering whether there is any tax to pay on this sale?

    If the property has been designated as your principal residence for the entire length of ownership, then there are no tax implications. To qualify as a principal residence, the property must have been owned by you or jointly with another person. Additionally, you, your spouse (current or former), or any of your children must have lived in the property for some period of time.

    You are only allowed to designate one property per year as your principal residence. Situations that tend to complicate tax matters occur when more than one property is owned during the same time period.

    When this occurs, you should designate the years of principal residence to the property with the highest capital gains on a per year basis. This will help minimize income taxes throughout your life, whereas designating all the years to the first property sold will simply minimize taxes in the first year of sale.

    What properties are eligible for the principal residence exemption?

    • House
    • Cottage
    • Condominium
    • Apartment (in an apartment building or duplex)
    • Trailer, Motor Home, or Houseboat

    How do I calculate my exemption?

    (1 + # of years designated / total # of years owned) x Capital Gain = Principal Residence Exemption

    Example:

    You own two properties:

    1. House – purchased in 2001 for $350,000
    2. Cottage – purchased in 2005 for $150,000

    In 2014, you sold your house for $500,000 and moved into your cottage (which had a market value of $200,000).

    House:

    • Initial purchase price: $350,000
    • Sale price: $500,000
    • Gain: $150,000 ($500,000 – $350,000)
    • # of years owned: 14
    • Gain per year: $10,714

    Cottage:

    • Initial purchase price: $150,000
    • Sale price: $200,000
    • Gain: $50,000 ($200,000 – $150,000)
    • # of years owned: 10
    • Gain per year: $5,000

    This example shows the accrued gains per year on the house is higher than the accrued gains on the cottage. Therefore, designating it as the principal residence for all those years is the most appropriate tax decision. This would result in the entire gain on the sale of the house begin exempt for tax purposes. Going forward, the cottage can claim the principal residence designation.

    If you are considering selling a property and have further questions, you should contact your accountant at once for helpful advice!

    Read More
  • So you won the jackpot…
    Posted

    Get to know the potential tax implications you are facing.

    The Canadian and Ontario lotteries are ever­-increasing, creating more temptation to buy into the pool and win it big. But what tax implications would you face if you became the lucky winner?

    In Canada, lottery winnings are not taxable and are not required to be included as part of your annual income. However, additional income earned on the winnings (such as interest on investments) is considered taxable and must be reported to the CRA.

    If you wish to share your fortune with friends and family members, they will not be taxed on the winnings since this is considered to be a gift and is not required to be reported as income. However, if additional income (such as interest) is earned on the gift, the same rule applies, and any additional income earned is considered taxable.

    Gifting to friends or family members do not have income tax implications either. For example, a father can gift $10,000 to his son for the purchase of a new vehicle. This gift is non­-taxable income for the son and, likewise, is not tax deductible to the father. The only situation where tax comes into play with gifting is when the gift is capital property (real estate or investments), at which point the property is deemed to be disposed of at its fair market value.

    If you have any questions regarding the tax implications on your lottery winnings or general gifting rules, please contact your accountant for assistance.

    Get to know the potential tax implications you are facing.

    The Canadian and Ontario lotteries are ever­-increasing, creating more temptation to buy into the pool and win it big. But what tax implications would you face if you became the lucky winner?

    In Canada, lottery winnings are not taxable and are not required to be included as part of your annual income. However, additional income earned on the winnings (such as interest on investments) is considered taxable and must be reported to the CRA.

    If you wish to share your fortune with friends and family members, they will not be taxed on the winnings since this is considered to be a gift and is not required to be reported as income. However, if additional income (such as interest) is earned on the gift, the same rule applies, and any additional income earned is considered taxable.

    Gifting to friends or family members do not have income tax implications either. For example, a father can gift $10,000 to his son for the purchase of a new vehicle. This gift is non­-taxable income for the son and, likewise, is not tax deductible to the father. The only situation where tax comes into play with gifting is when the gift is capital property (real estate or investments), at which point the property is deemed to be disposed of at its fair market value.

    If you have any questions regarding the tax implications on your lottery winnings or general gifting rules, please contact your accountant for assistance.

    Read More